Paleontology is the study of fossils and is concerned not only with their description and classification but also with an analysis of the evolution of the organisms involved. Simple fossil forms can be found in early Precambrian rocks as old as 3,500,000,000 years, and it is widely considered that life on Earth must have begun before the appearance of the oldest rocks. Paleontological research of the fossil record since the Cambrian Period has contributed much to the theory of evolution of life on Earth.

Several disciplines of the geologic sciences have practical benefits for society. The geologist is responsible for the discovery of minerals (such as lead, chromium, nickel, and tin), oil, gas, and coal, which are the main economic resources of the Earth; for the application of knowledge of subsurface structures and geologic conditions to the building industry; and for the prevention of natural hazards or at least providing early warning of their occurrence. (For further examples, see below Practical applications.)

Astrogeology is important in that it contributes to understanding the development of the Earth within the solar system. The U.S. Apollo program of manned missions to the Moon, for example, provided scientists with firsthand information on lunar geology, including observations on such features as meteorite craters that are relatively rare on Earth. Unmanned space probes have yielded significant data on the surface features of many of the planets and their satellites. Since the 1970s even such distant planetary systems as those of Jupiter, Saturn, and Uranus have been explored by probes.

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The Geological Society
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